August 8th 2018
 

On Friday August 17th at the Sackville Manor House, 15 Fort Sackville Road, Bedford, a Quoits tournament 95 years in the making will take place. In 1923 Robert Brenton, one-time warden of Halifax County and resident of Rockingham, donated a trophy for a quoits competition' between Rockingham and Bedford. Bedford won that year and the trophy has not been played for since that date.

From 12 noon until 2 PM on August 17th (with a rain date of August 24th) teams from Waverley, Lower Sackville, Bedford, Rockingham and Fairview will compete in the Second Brenton Trophy tournament in ninety-five years.

Quoits is an ancient game played with rings and in a fashion similar to horseshoes. The game is scored like curling.  Teams representing the Fairview Historical Society, Rockingham Heritage, The Fort Sackville Foundation, the Fultz Corner Restoration Society and Waverley Heritage Museum will be on site, all attempting to take the Brenton Trophy home for the first time since the roaring twenties!The public is invited to come out and cheer on their home town favourites.  It is also an opportunity to tour the Manor House and Fort Sackville grounds. Scott Manor House is open for guided tours throughout the summer from 10 – 4pm daily and 12 – 8pm on Wednesdays. Our Tea Room is open Monday through Friday from 2 – 4pm, cash only.

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PRESS RELEASE


Bedford’s stately Scott Manor House can cast a spell on visitors, and Bedford writer/researcher Terry Gordon confesses that it has done just that for him since his first visit many years ago.  Gordon’s main interest is in the years from 1870 to 1945, when the property belonged to the Ternan family.  Dr. John Ternan, retired fleet surgeon of the Royal Navy, raised his family of nine there when the house built by Joseph Scott (he called it “my mansion house”) still cast its morning shadow on the abandoned barracks of Fort Sackville.  Regrettably few documents survive from the days when the Ternans provided a glittering hub for social events in Bedford, a problem that has not deterred Gordon from writing about the family.  He says, “Dr. John’s youngest daughter, Eleanor, married a Royal Navy officer; Geraldine, Jenn, and Kate had to wait for me to bring them three suitors.” 
 
The first of Gordon’s two 3-act stage plays, Morning Post at the Manor House, focuses on 1903, a year that brought unexpected mail and unexpected events to Scott Manor.  Gordon notes that “it was an extraordinarily crowded year in the lives of the Ternans, and I’ve taken the liberty of crowding it even more for dramatic purposes.”  He describes his play as a mix of history, mystery, hijinks, and romance. 
 
On Monday, August 20, at 1:30 PM, the summer staff at Scott Manor House will give an on site reading of a key scene from Morning Post at the Manor House.
 
Scott Manor House is open for guided tours throughout the summer from 10 – 4pm daily and 12 – 8pm on Wednesdays. Our Tea Room is open Monday through Friday from 2 – 4pm, cash only.